The strong export ties between the United Kingdom and Ireland have been a major economic driver for both countries. Not  only is the United Kingdom  one of the biggest export partners of Ireland – buying a total of €15 billion worth of goods in 2016  plus 50% of the country’s exported beef and 42% of its food and drink – but UK is Ireland’s only land border in EU, and vice versa. In fact, some 80% of the Irish road freight that reaches mainland Europe passes through the UK.

Those factors alone make UK-Irish trade a unique relationship. However, looming Brexit looming, there are critical border issues and challenges that are expected to disrupt this trading relationship and force Irish exporters to rethink their supply chain operations.

Yet, despite the potential supply chain upheaval Brexit could cause, a large majority of Irish export companies are yet to develop mitigation strategies.  According to reports, two-thirds of Irish exporters are still unprepared for the impending withdrawal of the UK from EU and have not put any countermeasures in place to mitigate Brexit risks. Of these companies, 23% said the lack of information on alternative markets to the UK as the main obstacle to identifying and establishing a foothold in new markets.

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Global Trade in Fresh Produce – Challenges and Trends.
The global fresh produce market has been growing steadily. In 2016, market research provider Euromonitor International reported that the global demand for fresh food increased by nearly 3% over global demand in 2015. This was in line with Compound Annual Growth Rate of 3% achieved over the 2011-2016 review period.

The growth of this market is also supported by a separate report from Wiseguyreports.com, which forecasts that the global fresh produce market will grow at a CAGR of 3.01% from 2017 to 2021.

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21st Century Warehousing: Strategy and Operation

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21st Century Warehousing: Strategy and Operation  

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