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A hotbed for entrepreneurship, the Gulf area has become one of the leading business destinations in the world today. With an abundance of opportunities for Irish exporters, the Gulf area is an umbrella term encompassing the Arab states that border the Persian Gulf, namely Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, and United Arab Emirates (UAE). These countries make up the economic and political block of the Gulf Cooperation Council.

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A report from Gartner predicts that by 2020, more than 50% of major business processes will incorporate some form of the Internet of Things (IoT). One such business process is the supply chain. Though often overlooked, the application of IoT in supply chain management is already making exceptional changes and developments in international trade landscape.

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Las aplicaciones de la tecnología de la cadena de bloques o “blockchain” en la cadena de suministro y en el comercio internacional tienen el potencial de mejorar la velocidad, la transparencia y los costes en transacciones de topo tipo de manera espectacular y al mismo tiempo de aportar información precisa en tiempo real sobre el estado y la situación de los bienes y los inventarios a lo largo de la cadena de suministro.

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I was delighted to interview Hugh Kelly, Managing Director of Marketing Associates, on Dublin South FM’s Breakthrough Brands. Hugh Kelly is a veritable expert on what it takes to successfully break into overseas markets.

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Blockchain technology applications in supply chain and international trade have the potential to spectacularly improve the speed, transparency and costs of all types of transactions as well as to provide real-time information on the status of assets and inventories across the whole supply chain.

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SMEs that decide to take their business to a higher international level have a lot to gain from globalization.

Nowadays, globalization has become a major driver that impacts not only the largest corporations but the SMEs that operate in highly dynamic and turbulent environment. With the rapid increase of internationalization over the past decades, more and more SMEs can afford a much broader market reach, compete strongly on price with domestic firms, and leverage the specialized skills of contract workers from around the globe.

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If you are convinced that internationalization is an effective way to grow your business and that you need to start exporting or to diversify your current exporting activity, the next question is: where to? Over recent years, Irish SMEs have learned that the Irish market alone is not enough to support a long-term growth strategy of any scale and given the uncertainty around Brexit and its aftermath, the time has now come to look further afield.

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I was delighted to be interviewed by Dr. Nilda Perez of Foresight Strategies Group in New York on her Dr. Nilda Show on the topic of business internationalization for American SMEs. While only 1% of America’s 30 million companies export to overseas markets, those that do export are more productive, more profitable and stay in business longer than those that don’t.

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Since the end of the Second World War in 1945 English has increasingly become the international language of business. How did this come about? How did a language, that in 1500 was spoken by maybe 5 million people, on an island off the coast of Europe come to be the lingua franca of the twenty-first century. Today, between 1.5 and 1.7 billion speak English as a first or second language in countries spread all over the work, that is almost one quarter of the population of the planet. The real story of how English came to this position of dominance in one of geopolitics and economic power. The French language had long been dominant in international affairs until the 19th century and indeed it is still one of the most influential language in international diplomacy. During the 18th and 19th centuries, the truly global British empire grew and consolidated across the globe and encompassed areas of the world such as North America, South and East Africa, the Indian subcontinent, Australia and Oceania. As the 20th century opened and Britain’s star began to wane after the First World War, the English speaking United States emerged as the new global superpower and after World War 2 left many parts of Europe and East Asia in ruins, American economic, cultural and military power became dominant on the world stage and along with it the English language.

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It’s clear that the growth of international trade over the past decades has helped improved the global economy and has created more opportunities many developing countries. In order to sustain this trend, logistics hubs that facilitate the manufacturing and distribution of goods have been established in virtually every country around the world.

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